Train outer or inner chest? Here’s what you need to know!

Wondering how to specifically train the outer or inner part of the chest? Maybe you’ve looked at the pecs of different athletes, noticed they have a different shape, and are wondering how to achieve that look? While it’s generally recommended to train a muscle from different angles to improve proportions, there are a few things to keep in mind when it comes to the chest. After reading this article, you’ll know what affects the structure of the pectoral muscles and how to target individual parts.

Can you train the outer and inner chest?

No, it is not possible to train the outer or inner part of the chest specifically. The reason for this is that the muscle fibers do not extend vertically but horizontally across the chest. The muscle volume of the outer and inner chest is therefore dependent on the muscle volume of the entire chest and cannot be increased independently on one side or the other. The only way to improve the outer and inner chest is to increase the muscle volume of the entire chest.

What affects the structure of the outer and inner chest?

The appearance of the outer and inner chest is determined by the genetic structure and muscle volume of the entire chest. If you look at the chest of different athletes and bodybuilders, you will notice that they often look different. For example, the middle attachments of the pectoral muscle fibers of some athletes are close together, while those of others are further apart, creating a larger gap between the two pectorals. The other factor is muscle volume: since muscle fibers extend horizontally across the chest, as previously mentioned, the outer and inner parts of the chest will automatically grow as the muscle volume of the entire chest increases.

How can you target individual parts of the chest?

While it is not possible to isolate the outer or inner part of the chest, it is possible to target the upper, middle and lower chest. Depending on the angle at which the chest works, some muscle fibers are used more than the others. The emphasis is on increased, because it is not possible to train these muscle fibers completely separately. At a neutral angle like the flat bench press (0 degrees) you work the chest in a balanced way, at a positive angle like the incline bench press (30 to 45 degrees) you work the upper muscle fibers more and at a negative angle like the negative bench press (-30 to -45 degrees) you work the lower muscle fibers more.

Conclusion

Targeting the outer or inner part of the chest is not possible. The muscle fibers extend horizontally across the chest, which means that during chest training the outer chest is used just as much as the inner chest. The structure of the pectoral muscle fibers is genetically determined and the only way to improve the outer and inner chest is to increase the muscle volume of the entire chest. However, you can use a positive, negative or neutral angle to increase the upper, lower and middle muscle fibers of the chest.

Did this article help you with your chest workout? Feel free to share your experience in the comments, I look forward to exchanging ideas with you. If you have any other questions, you can also ask me there, I’ll be happy to help you!

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